Final Project


by Jesse Stommel

I've uploaded details to the schedule for our last several weeks together in #DH306.

The description of the final project for the class is pointedly vague: "a collaborative digital project that engages overarching questions raised by our discussions. Let your imagination run wild about what you might like to write, build, code, hack, etc." The main assignment for this week will be to write the assignment description for your final project. Rather than meticulously designing a prompt for your work, I've decided to step back and ask you to craft your own assignment to conclude this course. Because you will each be approaching this in different ways, I've also had to be somewhat vague with my description of what you'll be doing leading up to the publishing of your final project.

The gist:
Design the Assignment
Document Your Process
Share the Result

And, most importantly, interpret any instructions that I've given you (implicit or explicit) as loosely as possible. The goal is for you to do work that helps you make connections -- that helps you draw together the thinking you've done over the last 10 (perhaps 20) weeks. Feel free to use anything you've produced as raw material, expanding on any work you've done in this class (or any of your other classes, for that matter). We will be working collaboratively, by offering feedback to each other through the various stages of this work; however, I also encourage you to collaborate more fully with each other on your work.

As I said at the outset of the course, Digital Humanities is (at least in part) about breaking stuff, so feel free to dramatically reinvent the expectations usually reserved for final projects in college classes. Make this assignment your own. But feel free to call on me for help.

See the schedule for more info.
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Descent into Print


by
Sean Michael Morris

Print, though many may say so, is not dead. Or, it does not have to die. The world of post-print fiction is the world of viral fiction, infectious reading, the sharing of pages that contaminates the bloodstream, makes weak the heart, and makes ravenous and rabid the brain. Surrounded as we are by a network of words at all times in all places, we forget that more of our stories were told first on paper than they were online. Whether in the watercolor pages of a children’s book, or the festering pile of papers in the corner of a certain old man’s apartment. As much as we network the digital, we also network the physical,
the material. We transfigure it into code and into bits and bytes and messages and updates. Print does not die, it becomes the digital. Flaming forward as a phoenix from what we mistook for ashes. Read More...
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[End of Transcript]


by
Sean Michael Morris

What does it mean when you read, and I read, and we read the same thing but not in the same ways, and then use this Internet to talk about it? Or to read it together, two pairs of eyes -- or a hundred pairs -- fixed upon the same text? I am creating content right now by drawing your attention to words I didn’t write. I am deciding what you read based on what I think is important; veritably, legible.
Read More...
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Reading House of Leaves

This is not for you. Read More...
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The Digital Humanities is About Breaking Stuff


by Jesse Stommel

Folks have argued that the Digital Humanities is about building stuff and sharing stuff -- that the digital humanities reframes the work we do in the humanities as less consumptive and more curatorial, less solitary and more interactive. I would argue, though, that literary studies has always been intensely active, an engaged dance between the text on a page and the ideas in our brains. And literary studies has always been intensely social, a vibrant ecosystem of shared, reworked, and retold stories. The margins of books as a vast network of playgrounds. The digital brings different playgrounds and new kinds of interaction, and we must incessantly ask questions of it, disturbing the edge upon which we find ourselves so precariously perched. And what the digital asks of us is that every assumption we have be turned on its head. Read More...
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